Sunday, March 26, 2017

Moral Development and Reality, continued

Continuing this post, also of interest in the referenced pages is that formal operations are a necessary prerequisite for the meta-cognitive, meta-ethical investigation of such spiritual concerns via the likes of meditation. And while this existential domain does not follow an invariant stage sequence, it is also nonetheless developmental. These existential developments are indeed Kohlberg's 'state-stages' 5, 6 and 7. Again akin to the WC lattice in that the 'state-stages' can also be 'above' the other stages when one achieves a certain stage development. But they can also still be interpreted using lower moral stages.
 
This lends further credence to my long-held argument that the rational ego is necessary for both meditative state training and the door to postmetaphysical stage development. It is also the fulcrum around which both pre- and post-formal rational states and stages 'fold', overcoming the invariant sequencing of ever-increasing complexity in the standard stages. The latter might be very useful but are not necessary for this process,
and in fact could very well inhibit it when they are not interpreted postmetaphysicially.

Instead of calling it 2nd-tier, a sequential metaphor, a more apt metaphor would be the twisted or twining tier.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Coward Nunes backing down in good Twamp style

Continuing this post, Nunes has to backtrack his previous frantic story to confirm Twamp's paranoia of being wiretapped. This led the Republican Congressional Campaign Committee to headline the story: Confirmed: Obama Spied on Trump. So Nunes, I guess realizing the craze he started, updated his story saying that as for Trump's assertion the Obama wiretapped him, "that didn't happen." TYT explores both stories in this clip, setting the record straight on the initial eavesdropping.

Change is AP style causing gang-land slayings

See this story on the Associated Press Stylebook now allowing 'they' as a singular pronoun. The Onion has some fun with it in this satire, copied below.

4 Copy Editors Killed In Ongoing AP Style, Chicago Manual Gang Violence

NEW YORK—Law enforcement officials confirmed Friday that four more copy editors were killed this week amid ongoing violence between two rival gangs divided by their loyalties to the The Associated Press Stylebook and The Chicago Manual Of Style. “At this time we have reason to believe the killings were gang-related and carried out by adherents of both the AP and Chicago styles, part of a vicious, bloody feud to establish control over the grammar and usage guidelines governing American English,” said FBI spokesman Paul Holstein, showing reporters graffiti tags in which the word “anti-social” had been corrected to read “antisocial.” “The deadly territory dispute between these two organizations, as well as the notorious MLA Handbook gang, has claimed the lives of more than 63 publishing professionals this year alone.” Officials also stated that an innocent 35-year-old passerby who found himself caught up in a long-winded dispute over use of the serial, or Oxford, comma had died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.


Moral Development and Reality

Continuing recent posts on morality, I just downloaded a free copy of this book from bookzz.org: Moral Development and Reality: Beyond the Theories of Kohlberg, Hoffman and Haidt by John C. Gibbs (Oxford UP, 2014). I'm looking at the section of "conclusion and critique" of Haidt starting on p. 31. Gibbs appreciates that we should account for our earlier human history and more primitive brain centers in describing morality. But to limit it to these structures and history at the expense of later brain structures and evolutionary development is another thing.

"The negative skew in Haidt’s descriptive work discourages study in moral psychology of higher reaches of morality such as rational moral reflection, empathy for the plight of entire out-groups, moral courage, and the cultivation of responsible, mature moral agency —broadly, study of 'the scope of human possibilities, of what people can do morally, if they are prepared, through development and education, to approach life’s important issues in a thoughtful way'” (34).

Jeffrey Sachs interview

On Hartmann yesterday. He sees the wholesale corruption of the Republican Party as morally evil, how they do not even blink when confronted with the truth that their health(don't)care bill is all about tax breaks for the rich at the expense of many Americans' health. Same with climate change, selling out the literal destruction of the planet for oil money in their pockets. Sachs then discusses some possible solutions from his new book.

Listen Liberal

I've posted before on Thomas Frank's work, particularly his book Listen Liberal. You can search for those posts in the search box on the upper right column. Here's a one-hour Frank presentation with Q&A about it if you don't have the time to read the book.

New Rule on Twamp's betrayals

Maher goes through some of the major ones. Twamp promised lower drug prices and instead will deregulate drugs further. He promised the XL pipeline would be built with American still and it won't. He promised to save coal miners but his budget guts help to them. He promised better and cheaper health insurance for everyone but the plan proposed was the complete opposite: not repeal and replace but bait and switch. He promised Mexico will pay for his wall and we will pay for it. It's endless promises of the moon while delivering a trip to the swamp. Maher's hoping Twamp supporters will wake up and see they've been conned bigly. But that will require some semblance of wits, and supporters to date just don't seem to have even a smidgen given they've fallen hard for this DonConMan.

Repeal and Disgrace

Maher's monologue comments on the failure of Twamp(don't)care. The Freedom (from healthcare) Caucus wasn't happen because it was still too generous and wanted and got cuts to hospitalization, doctor visits, maternity leave, mental health, lab tests, prescriptions and emergency room visits. Even after that it was still not cruel enough for these hateful cretins and they still vowed to vote against it. He then goes on to other political news.

Causation in multiple meta-frames, or InterPlayStation

A few things have reminded me of Bruce's work "Sophia Speaks" with parts of speech related to philosophical inclinations within plural meta-frameworks. One is Lakoff's work where he said in this interview:

"The science and the social sciences all use causal theories, but the metaphors for causation can vary widely and thus so can the kinds of causal inferences you can draw. Again, there is nothing wrong with this. You just have to realize that causation is not just one thing. There are many kinds of modes of causation, each with different logical inferences, that physical, social, and cognitive scientists attribute to reality using different metaphors for causation. Again, it is important to know which metaphor for causation you are using. Science cannot be done without metaphors of all sorts, starting with a choice of metaphors for causation. Most interestingly, if you look at the history of philosophy, you will find a considerable number of "theories of causation." When we looked closely at the philosophical theories of causation over the centuries, they all turned out to be one or another of our commonplace metaphors for causation. What philosophers have done is to pick their favorite metaphor for causation and put it forth as an eternal truth."

Another is Edwards et al work when they said:

Kohlberg and encouraging moral development

Continuing recent posts on morality, a good summary of Kohlberg's work is here. Of note is how to frame moral arguments to motivate upward change on the moral scale. It is in the last 2 pages of the article on implications for education. One was engaging in moral dilemmas via discussion, allowing students to uncover the higher code for themselves and providing encouraging feedback. Another method is encouraging the 'just community.' First establish where the group is, then engage moral discussion as before, then promote and reinforce wider and more comprehensive group inclusion.